The Smoking Gun story is a little bit hard to follow, but here are a few highlights:

As an "informant in development," as one federal investigator referred to Sharpton, the protest leader was seen as an intriguing prospective source, since he had significant contacts in politics, boxing, and the music industry.

As previously reported, Colombo crime family captain Michael Franzese, who knew Sharpton, enlisted the activist's help in connecting with Don King. Franzese and Sharpton were later surreptitiously filmed during one meeting with the undercover, while Sharpton and Daniel Pagano, a Genovese soldier, were recorded at another sit-down. Pagano's father Joseph was a Genovese power deeply involved in the entertainment industry (and who also managed the crime family's rackets in counties north of New York City).

During one meeting with Sharpton, the undercover agent offered to get him "pure coke" at $35,000 a kilo. As the phony drug kingpin spoke, Sharpton nodded his head and said, "I hear you." When the undercover promised Sharpton a 10 percent finder's fee if he could arrange the purchase of several kilos, the reverend referred to an unnamed buyer and said, "If he's gonna do it, he'll do it much more than that." The FBI agent steered the conversation toward the possible procurement of cocaine, sources said, since investigators believed that Sharpton acquaintance Daniel Pagano—who was not present—was looking to consummate drug deals. Joseph Pagano, an East Harlem native who rose through a Genovese crew notorious for narcotics trafficking, spent nearly seven years in federal prison for heroin distribution.

While Sharpton did not explicitly offer to arrange a drug deal, some investigators thought his interaction with the undercover agent could be construed as a violation of federal conspiracy laws. Though an actual prosecution, an ex-FBI agent acknowledged, would have been "a reach," agents decided to approach Sharpton and attempt to "flip" the activist, who was then shy of his 30th birthday. In light of Sharpton's relationship with Don King, FBI agents wanted his help in connection with the bureau's three-year-old boxing investigation, code named "Crown Royal" and headed by Spinelli and Pritchard.

The FBI agents confronted Sharpton with the undercover videos and warned that he could face criminal charges as a result of the secret recordings. Sharpton, of course, could have walked out and ran to King, Franzese, or Pagano and reported the FBI approach (and the fact that drug dealer "Victor Quintana" was actually a federal agent).

In subsequent denials that he had been "flipped," Sharpton has contended that he stiffened in the face of the FBI agents, meeting their bluff with bluster and bravado. He claimed to have turned away Spinelli & Co., daring them to "Indict me" and "Prosecute." Sharpton has complained that the seasoned investigators were "trying to sting me, entrap me…a young minister."

In fact, Sharpton fell for the FBI ruse and agreed to cooperate, a far-reaching decision he made without input from a lawyer, according to sources. "I think there was some fear [of prosecution] on his part," recalled a former federal agent. In a TSG interview, Sharpton claimed that he rebuffed the FBI agents, who, he added, threatened to serve him with a subpoena to testify before a federal grand jury investigating King. After being confronted by the bureau, Sharpton said he consulted with an attorney (whom he declined to identify).

Here is the full story.