Interesting Paragraph in the LA TimesS

I learned from one of the threads on Lacey's Tonight Show layoff post that Sean Saves the World has been cancelled. Perhaps indicative of their problem is that every week as I've streamed the show, I've thought that I should post about it to Crosstalk, but then I'd forget and not remember again until the next week.

Basically, I've wanted to say how everyone on the show holds their own, even the fellow from that god-awful thing with Don Johnson's daughter last year, but it's really great that Linda Lavin hasn't lost a step and I believe Thomas Lennon could steal the show.

When I learned from the Defamer thread that NBC had stopped production, I ran the title through a search engine to learn more. Because I like to start with the more credible, this led me to a bit from the Los Angeles Times which I thought had an interesting paragraph.

NBC, which also canceled "The New Normal" last year after just one season, has not given up on series about gay families. This week the network announced it had ordered a sitcom pilot produced by Ellen DeGeneres about a pregnant lesbian and her straight male best friend.

I'd certainly agree with the writer's characterization of The New Normal as being about "gay families" — though I'm not sure about the phrasing, but I agree with the point. Another of those things which had been on my list of things to blog at one time was how great I thought it was as a cultural touchstone and I wasn't really that disappointed when the show wasn't renewed because I thought they had told a good story in full, so it had an end.

What I find interesting is Sean Saves the World being described the same way.

Sure, if you get out a Webster's, the definition might be true — Sean was gay and he had a family — but other than mentions of old boyfriends, a date or two and the episode where he went all flamboyant to do something nice for his kid, "gay" wasn't really a big part of the show. A lot more of his "family" was about his relationship with his mother (Lavin) and probably half of every episode was a workplace comedy.