(AP) — Representatives of the People For The Ethical Treatment Of Animals today said they were dismayed at reports that author Harper Lee is set to publish a sequel to her acclaimed novel "To Kill A Mockingbird."

"We believe this sends the wrong message to people, particularly children, who will see this as a celebration of the murder of defenseless animals," said PETA Spokesperson Lucy Charms. "We have fought long and hard to keep the original out of schools and libraries and were close to eradicating the novel's influence on young minds. We are deeply concerned that this could be a grave setback to our ongoing efforts to end the celebration of the wanton slaugther of wildlife."

Charms compared the release of the book to the current controversy over vaccinations.

"A very small number of people chose not to vaccinate their children," she said. "And now there is a nationwide outbreak of measles. One can only assume that the publication of this book will, in a similar way, effect the mockingbird population."

PETA officials said that they planned to stage protests, including book burnings, around schools and libraries on the date of new novel's publication.

"We feel that you must meet fire with fire," Charms said. "Only through eliminating books that support the neo-conservative bird hunting patriarchal human centered power structure can real understanding and knowledge be obtained."