There's a pretty long article about Gawker and FOIA requests at pointer.org today. Nothing too startling, but interesting reading. Worth noting, I suppose, that John Cook is on the FBI's list of 'vexsome filers' because of all the FOIA requests and appeals he's file over the years. (though i have to admit, i don't remember this ever being a story around here in 2010. was i totally asleep?) Anyway, an excerpt from today's Poynter post:

Cook has been filing public-records requests since he worked as a reporter for Brill's Content in 2000 and 2001. (When he covered television for The Chicago Tribune from 2002-2005, he didn't get to flex those muscles much, just the odd FCC request.) He's got a folder on his computer with hundreds of open FOIA requests. When filing, he doesn't use online forms "because Gawker would often get hassled by FOIA officers because they weren't familiar with us." He faxes requests from his computer, on Gawker letterhead.

Now that he's running the New York-based publication, Cook said he tries to "instill that in my people: All you need is the thought, and you fire it off, and you forget about it." Send off enough requests and eventually "you start getting them back two a week," he said. "The downside of that is if they try to screw you or they deny it, it's hard to remember and keep on them."

"It is very much understood that that is part of my beat," Gawker reporter J.K. Trotter said in a phone call, talking about records requests. Last summer, the former IvyGate editor sold Gawker a freelance story based on a FOIA request he made to the City University of New York to learn it was paying Gen. David Petraeus $200,000 to teach. Once CUNY, dazed by the bad publicity, announced it would pay Petraeus $1 instead, Cook made Trotter an offer.