From the Tampa Bay Times: Danielle was shooting hoops with her father that Sunday afternoon. Dooley came from his home across the street to complain about a 14-year-old skateboarder who had gotten James' permission to use the other side of the court.

An argument between Dooley and James got the attention of a married couple, Michael and Michelle Whitt, who were practicing serves on the adjacent tennis court.

The bizarre nature of the dispute, they said, caused them to stop and watch. It quickly took a lethal turn.

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They testified last week they saw Dooley flip up his T-shirt, revealing a gun in his waistband, as he cursed James. They said Dooley then turned and headed home, but James spun him around and tried to grab the gun.

The skateboarder, Spencer Arthur, also watched, stunned. He didn't see Dooley flash a gun but said he saw him pull out the weapon as he spun around.

Danielle could hardly remember anything. She clutched a toy bunny named Monica as she testified. She has been in counseling for two years. She said she only remembered Dooley trying to go home.

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"The only consistency in their testimony," defense attorney Ronald Tulin said to the jury, "was that Mr. Dooley walked away. How can you convict him of manslaughter if he's trying to walk away?"

Dooley, who is 5-feet-7 and weighs 160 pounds, told jurors he had to struggle with a man 28 years younger who was 6-1 and 240 pounds. He said he pulled out the gun only after James grabbed him by the throat and began yanking him to the ground. "I had no other choice,'' he said.

"It just didn't hold water with what the other witnesses said," said [jury foremans] Joss, 57, of Tampa.

Though the witnesses offered differing testimonies, those accounts were more consistent with one another than Dooley's, he said. And those witnesses had no motivations other than to tell the truth, he said.

"They really had nothing to gain," Joss said. "They just seemed honest to me. It didn't match exactly 100 percent but, again, that's understandable. Three different people can see something three different ways."

Jurors didn't need a lot of time to reach a verdict, he said, because they were of one mind that the witnesses provided the most accurate testimony. He said there was no dissent.

......

After the trial, Jamaican-born Dooley blamed racism for his conviction.

"Do you really think that if it was the other way around and the skin color would be different we would be here today?" he asked reporters. "We wouldn't."

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Dooley's attorneys never suggested at trial that his skin color played a role. James was white. The jury of two women and four men was multiracial.

In convicting Dooley of manslaughter with a weapon, the jury rejected his claim of protection under Florida's "stand your ground" law.

The jurors had no problem with the law itself. It just didn't apply, one said. "The whole silly thing was over a skateboard," said jury foreman Walter Joss, "and it just escalated."

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Again, imagine if the races of the shooter and the dead guy were reversed. I guess the lesson of this and the Zimmerman killing is: in Florida, don't leave any witnesses. Sounds like the shooter had an awesome defense attorney. And the jury was just doing its job, right?