I've had Capote in my Netflix queue for a while, so in response to the Gizmodo list of things about to disappear that @Question_of_Fact linked the other day, I watched it last night.

The first thing I learned is that the movie isn't really conducive to streaming on a second screen while you work on the first because I kept wanting to look at it, so I didn't get much done.

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Another thing I learned was about Truman's lifelong friendship with Nelle Harper Lee. To Kill a Mockingbird is definitely great art, but I had never studied it or her, so learning that they lived near each other as children and that their lives were so intertwined, I added Monroeville to the list of places I'll swing through, the next time I'm passing by.

(I don't know and maybe somebody has a Dick Cavett or something to point toward where one or the other of them tell stories, but I remember the dreams and conversations my friends and I used to have on the tire swing or as we were walking to the store for a pack of smokes and a cold drink. As I watched the film, I tried to imagine the type of conversations they may have had and if their dreams held a candle to what they realized)

I also learned that she's still with us, though living in a home.

What really blew me away was that he died in one of Johnny Carson's ex's houses (Joanne) and that she may (or may not) have been given some of his ashes, which she kept on display, were stolen a couple of times and that some producers wanted to rent.

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All in all, I'd say the film was worth the time and good for a cheap or an included rent. I kind of think that somebody was interested enough to make it worth $3, which is the Google and Amazon price, they would have probably seen it by now.

Still, I'd recommend the flick.