Written in Ink

David Gregory met the press, and he was not greeted warmly

Via a long-form story at Washingtonian Magazine (because, of course it would be in 'Washingtonian'): It was the final indignity in a chaotic and embarrassing fall from the top. For six years, David Gregory had owned the most coveted job in political journalism. Meet the Press first aired in 1947 and is now the longest-running show on network television. It started as a half-hour press conference and evolved into the place where Presidents came to make news—John F. Kennedy called it "the 51st state."

But under Gregory, the most prestigious political franchise in Washington media had collapsed. Although he took over at a time when eyeballs were declining across the board because of 24-hour cable news networks and a constant stream of internet talking heads, no Sunday show plunged further than his. Between 2008, when Gregory took over, and last summer, just before he left, Meet the Press lost 43 percent of its viewers and dropped from first to third place in the ratings.

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