I didn't know about the anniversary coming up, but a film I watched yeaterday got me thinking about these kinds of things (which I might write a post about later).

I wanted to reply to this, but not being allowed to comment there while still finding myself at Clashtalk due to Crossposts, I'll post it here:

A foreigner butting in once again: MLK'S speech is something kids learn about in schools everywhere. Of course America's issues with racism get broadcast all over the world as well and many make the conclusions that America is a particularly racist country.

Still, the very similar kinds of injustices that MLK talks about are experienced by the Romani People in Europe for example, who in some countries are as large a part of the population as African-Americans in the US. No one can deny there has been progress in the US, and although the struggle continues, Europe has not moved forward at the same pace: things comparable to lynching still happen.

It may have been handled clumsily at your your church, but the successes of the civil rights movement is something all Americans should be proud of and the rest of the world should look pause to look at the state of their own home. In a way, the white people at your congregation reciting those words us a way of expressing that they feel the same way in their heart.


I wish white Europeans would do the same, instead of seeing the fight for racial equability something that once happened elsewhere and not relevant to making their own countries fairer places to live.